Tag Archives: Charles John Juba

Modern Nazis Should Follow Their LEaders and Kill Themselves

You do not praise Nazis. You do not become a Nazi. The only good Nazi is a dead Nazi.

The only good Nazi is a dead Nazi

Time to start rounding up all of the white supremacist, Fascist Nazis in the United States and have a mass hanging of these shitstains on the underwear of humanity.
A new neo-Nazi group in Spokane harkens back to era of virulent extremism in the Northwest

Before dawn on Feb. 8, a man in a dark jacket, mask and boots crossed the grounds of Temple Beth Shalom in Spokane, pulled out a can of red spray paint and began desecrating the property. Staring into a surveillance camera, he first sprayed its lens to cover it, then moved on, marking one side of the synagogue with a swastika and defacing a Holocaust memorial.

Chilling images from the cameras, described in court documents, led a member of the congregation to another revelation: the man was local.

The suspect was soon identified as Raymond Bryant, 44, of nearby Airway Heights, Spokane County, a member of a new neo-Nazi group that had sprung up in town, the member told police. He knew it was Bryant because he had dealt with him before.

For months, authorities said, Bryant had been spreading hate-filled leaflets in different pockets of Spokane and Airway Heights for his chapter of the 14First Foundation. Foundation fliers also have been distributed in Texas, Kentucky and Louisiana, according to the Western States Center, a Portland-based nonprofit that tracks extremism.

Citing the group’s website, police said the name is a reference to a 14-word white power slogan attributed to David Lane, a white nationalist and convicted felon who died in prison more than a decade ago.

Experts who track extremism in the Spokane area said 14First’s members had been attempting to show an increasing presence locally. While small, 14First’s beliefs and appearances remind them of a virulent strain of extremism present in the Inland Northwest decades ago, when the skinheads held broader presence before the Aryan Nation’s compound in North Idaho was demolished in 2001. 

Extremist groups have lingered in the Northwest, but a neo-Nazi group brazen enough to stand in front of a synagogue and perform a Nazi salute seemed to harken back to that era.

The emergence of 14First in Spokane adds the group to a long list of extremists that have sought a foothold in the Northwest over the years — from the Church of Jesus Christ Christian-Aryan Nations to the Northwest Front.

The Aryan Nations compound in Hayden, Idaho, about 30 miles northeast of Spokane, had been a central meeting spot for white supremacists from the 1970s until the 1990s, when a lawsuit led to its downfall.


Led by the Rev. Richard Butler, it had been among the United States’ most infamous examples of extremism and held the goal of creating a “national racial state,” according to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

The Aryan Nations had influenced other groups, including The Order, which was also known as the Brüder Schweigen, or Silent Brotherhood. The violent neo-Nazi gang’s roughly two dozen members included followers of Butler. 

From 1983 to 1984, The Order’s members robbed banks, set off bombs and murdered Alan Berg, a Jewish radio host in Denver. Robert Jay Mathews, the Order’s founder, was killed in a shootout with the FBI on Whidbey Island in 1984. 

More recently, the Northwest Front, a neo-Nazi group, advocated for an all-white state in the Pacific Northwest. In 2018, its founder, Harold Covington, died in his Bremerton apartment. 

In total, the Southern Poverty Law Center tracked 22 hate groups in Washington state in 2020, including 14First. 

Miri Cypers, the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League’s Pacific Northwest office, said her organization classifies 14First as a small neo-Nazi group that began promoting itself and distributing propaganda around October 2019. 

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/times-watchdog/a-new-neo-nazi-group-in-spokane-harkens-back-to-era-of-virulent-extremism-in-the-northwest/

These are the “supreme” examples of the human race? Really?

Neo-Nazi Rally Draws About Two Dozen People and Upends a Small Georgia City

A neo-Nazi rally outside of Atlanta on Saturday drew only a few participants and did not last very long.

But the event still upended Newnan, Ga., a city of about 38,000, for an afternoon as downtown shops closed and counterprotesters gathered. Hasco Craver, the assistant city manager, said more than 700 law enforcement officers were present from 42 agencies.

Members of the National Socialist Movement, a white nationalist organization that has been labeled a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, gained a permit last month for a rally from 3 to 5 p.m. at a park. Organizers estimated the rally could draw 50 to 100 people, city officials said.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/21/us/neo-nazi-rally-georgia.html

Hitler committed suicide. So did a lot of other Nazi leaders. All Nazis of today should follow their panty wearing, diaper shitting Nazi leaders and just kill themselves.

The state of the white supremacy and neo-Nazi groups in the US
Critics blame racism for weekend violence in Charlottesville.

The weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, underscored the re-emergence of white supremacy and nationalist groups in the United States, some experts say.

Racist hate groups have been a part of U.S. history for much of the country’s existence, but their recent revival has reached a startling point, according to one expert.

“Since the era of formal white supremacy — right before the Civil Rights Act when we ended [legal] segregation — since that time, this is the most enlivened that we’ve seen the white supremacist movement,” said Heidi Beirich, the director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), a legal advocacy organization that monitors such extremist groups.

The Alabama-based nonprofit’s statistics for hate groups in 2017 are not yet available, but it reported finding 917 of the groups across the country last year.

https://abcnews.go.com/US/state-white-supremacy-neo-nazi-groups-us/story?id=49205764

Federal, State and Local Law Enforcement Busting Up Nazi and White Supremacist circle jerk groups of shitstains

39 Members Of Unforgiven, Aryan Brotherhood Arrested In Pasco
The U.S. Attorney’s Office has arrested 39 members of the notorious gangs Unforgiven and United Aryan Brotherhood.

Following a lengthy investigation into arms and narcotics trafficking in Pasco County, the U.S. Attorney’s Office has arrested 39 members of the notorious gangs Unforgiven and United Aryan Brotherhood.

U.S. Attorney Maria Chapa Lopez, along with Pasco Sheriff Chris Nocco and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Assistant Special Agent in Charge Craig Kailimai announced the results of Operation Blackjack during a press conference Nov. 15.

This investigation is also the result of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces program. The principal mission of the OCDETF program is to identify, disrupt and dismantle the most serious drug trafficking and money laundering organizations and those primarily responsible for the nation’s drug supply.

Those charged include:

  • Michael Baun, 29, of Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Jade Blair, 25, of Spring Hill, charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Nicholas Bollman, 24, of Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Jonathan Budowski, 47, of Bushnell – charged with possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possessing a firearm as a convicted felon; possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime
  • Crystal Davis, 26, of Tampa, – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Donald “Dino” Dussell, 41, of Hudson – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon (eight counts); distributing heroin; distributing 5 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Kurt Gell, 39, of Bartow – pleaded guilty to possessing with the intent to distribute 5 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Melissa James, 33, of New Port Richey – charged with possessing with the intent to distribute 5 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Breanna Knights, 21, of New Port Richey – charged with distributing heroin; distributing crack cocaine
  • Jerry Koezeno, 30, of New Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon; distributing 5 grams or more of methamphetamine (two counts). Pleaded guilty on Oct. 3
  • Joshua Koezeno, 25, of New Port Richey – charged with possessing with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • James Thomas Lang, III, 32, of Tampa – charged with conspiring to distribute 100 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of heroin and 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine; distributing heroin and fentanyl (two counts); distributing methamphetamine; distributing heroin (two counts)
  • James Laughery, 44, of New Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon (four counts)
  • Stephen Kenneth Lore, 48, of Hudson- pleaded guilty to possessing with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Jamie Manz, 40, of Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon (two counts)
  • Andre Maytum, 34, of Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Chastity McBride, 35, of New Port Richey – charged with conspiring to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Stephanie McDonald, 35, of New Port Richey – pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime
  • Skyler McMillion, 33, of Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Jacob Montgomery, 25, of New Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Richard Morman, 31, of New Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon; possessing a pipe bomb; possessing pipe bombs
  • Arnold Gerard Nelson, Jr., 32, of Tampa- charged with conspiring to distribute 100 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of heroin, and 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine; distributing heroin and fentanyl (three counts); distributing methamphetamine; distributing heroin (two counts)
  • William “Billy the Kid” Ohrmund, 43, of Port Richey – pleaded guilty to possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine
  • Bobby Osborne, 33, of Hudson – charged with conspiring to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin and 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine
  • Chad Michael Overend, 37, of Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Ryan Perrin, 32, of Palm Harbor – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon (two counts)
  • Randi Potter, 44, of New Port Richey- charged with possessing with intent to distribute 5 grams or more of methamphetamine; possessing with intent to distribute 5 grams or more of methamphetamine; possessing with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; possessing with intent to distribute cocaine base (“crack cocaine”)
  • John Christopher Roberts, 35, of Orlando – pleaded guilty to conspiring to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime
  • Justin Ruth, 28, of New Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon (two counts)
  • Anthony Steve, 37, of Port Richey – pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon. Sentenced to 27 months imprisonment.
  • Keith Jason Stewart, 29, of Hudson- charged with distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine (two counts); possessing firearms and ammunition as a convicted felon
  • George Susick, 29, of Spring Hill – pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. Sentenced to five years imprisonment
  • Joseph Ward, 46, of New Port Richey – found guilty of possessing a firearm and ammunition as a convicted felon. Sentenced to four years and three months imprisonment
  • David Weyde, 30, of Port Richey – pleaded guilty to possessing a firearm as a convicted felon and to possessing an unregistered sawed-off shotgun. Sentenced to four years, three months imprisonment
  • Gary “Superman” Webb, 40, of Port Richey- charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Larry Dean Wilson, Jr., 41, of Land O’Lakes – charged with distributing 50 grams or more of methamphetamine (two counts); distributing marijuana
  • Michael Wilson, 45, of Spring Hill – convicted at trial of possessing a firearm and ammunition as a convicted felon. Sentenced to 10 years imprisonment
  • Andrew Windsor, 34, of Port Richey – charged with possessing a firearm as a convicted felon
  • Bradley Cox, 31, of Palmetto – charged with conspiring to possess with intent to distribute heroin; possessing with the intent to distribute fentanyl; possessing with the intent to distribute fentanyl.

Nice crew of Nazis and White Supremacists above huh?

https://patch.com/florida/newportrichey/39-members-unforgiven-aryan-brotherhood-arrested-pasco

Again, you dumb ass Nazis of today. Your fucking leader blew his diaper wearing, diseased brain out and you bitches should all follow your leader and do the same.
Sting targets white supremacists: Agents’ Nazi ‘gang’ duped suspects

A neo-Nazi motorcycle gang created by an undercover law-enforcement unit to investigate white supremacists and racist bikers has helped topple two domestic-terrorism groups in Central Florida.

The original investigation began in 2007, when an undisclosed agent traded emails with August Kreis III, a leader of the Aryan Nations hate group who wanted to form a Nazi motorcycle club to serve as the militant arm for white supremacists across the country, according to records obtained by the Orlando Sentinel.

Using a false identity, the agent with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office became the Aryan Nations’ top Florida administrator responsible for recruiting members for what would become the 1st SS Kavallerie Brigade Motorcycle Division — operating out of a clubhouse in St. Cloud.

Early members included at least two additional undercover FBI agents — who infiltrated the club — and a biker accused of offering $1,000 to anyone willing to shoot a black man riding an ATV in rural Osceola County, records show.

“The underlying aspect through all of it was that they were obtaining explosives and explosives expertise, and they intended to use them to kill people in the United States,” Orange-Osceola State Attorney Lawson Lamar told the Sentinel last week about what he characterized as the region’s most complex undercover operation in decades.

“We have a duty to stop what they were doing.”

The two cases — the motorcycle club and the takedown of the American Front white-supremacist group in Osceola in May — have resulted in 20 arrests on charges ranging from unsuccessful bomb and murder plots to drug dealing, illegal firearms possession and conducting paramilitary training to prepare for a race war.

In the spring of 2010, the local Joint Terrorism Task Force began looking at the American Front, another Nazi-influenced group of white supremacists rumored to be conducting combat training in rural Osceola County for a race war.

There were no law-enforcement officers inside that organization. Instead, that investigation relied on a former drug dealer working as a confidential informant for the government. In that capacity, the man received offers to join biker gangs and the Confederate Hammerskins, a skinhead group that required genetic testing to prove racial purity.

Emailing agents late at night, the informant reported on whom he met, the drugs they sold, the guns they carried and violent acts the group was planning.

Much of his work involved sitting on bar stools in Bithlo, Christmas and other small Central Florida towns where drinkers in places such as Hard Racks, Bottle Caps and the Soldier City Saloon belonged to racist groups and motorcycle gangs, according to copies of his emails.

By late summer 2010, the informant began hanging out at the American Front compound in Holopaw, where he joined members shooting AK-47s at water-filled jugs representing the heads of blacks and Jews.

Most of the combat training happened at that 10-acre compound, owned by American Front leader Marcus Faella. The informant mentioned that Faella also traded a motorcycle for a second plot of land — to use as a gun range — where a young black man had been killed, burned and buried in 2010 in a murder not related to the American Front or its members. American Front members used the desecrated grave as a urinal, records state.

The informant continued to work with authorities until his cover was blown in May. Fearing for his life, he called 911 while in a Melbourne movie theater where he had gone with American Front members to watch “The Three Stooges.” Arrests of 14 members began May 4 and continued through June.

https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/crime/os-neo-nazis-bikers-florida-white-power-20120728-story.html

The only good Nazi is a dead Nazi
Robert Jay Mathews, founder of the white-supremacist group The Order, is killed during an FBI siege on Whidbey Island on December 8, 1984.

On December 8, 1984, Robert Jay Mathews, founder of the violent white-supremist group The Order, is killed in a house fire near Smuggler’s Cove on Whidbey Island after a 35-hour standoff with the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). He has been the object of an intense manhunt since November 24, 1984, when he escaped from the FBI in Portland, Oregon, after wounding an agent in the leg. The Order’s legacy of terror will end on April 15, 1985, when 23 members of the gang are indicted by a federal grand jury in Seattle and arrested by the FBI. Twelve of the defendants will plead guilty before trial and many will become government witnesses. Ten of the defendants will go to trial and be found guilty of racketeering, conspiracy, and other offenses, including counterfeiting, armed robbery, and murder. They will be sentenced to terms ranging from 40 to 100 years in federal prison. The last defendant will go to trial in Missouri for murdering a state trooper. He will receive a life sentence.

In 1980, Mathews joined the National Alliance, a white-supremacist group founded by William Luther Pierce (1933-2002), a former Oregon State University physics professor and officer in the American Nazi Party led by George Lincoln Rockwell (1918-1967). Mathews read two books, published by the National Alliance, which had profound effects upon his life: Which Way Western Man? by William Gayley Simpson (1892-1991), which told of an insidious plot by the Jews to destroy the “white Christian race,” and The Turner Diaries by William L. Pierce, a novel about the supposed violent takeover of America by white supremacists who then form an elite paramilitary underground, called The Order, and take control of the whole world, eradicating all Jews and non-whites.

In February 1982, Mathews began attending services at the Church of Jesus Christ Christian inside the Aryan Nations compound in Hayden Lake, Idaho. The founder of the church and the leader of the Aryan Nations was Richard Girnt Butler (1918-2004), whose message combined an interpretation of Christianity with Nazism and the dream of a whites-only homeland centered in the pristine hills of North Idaho.

Shortly thereafter, Mathews founded the White American Bastion, a splinter group organized to attract white Christian families to the Northwest. In September 1983, he gave a short speech at a National Alliance convention in Arlington, Virginia, reporting on his efforts to recruit farmers and ranchers into the “white racialist movement.” Ending with a call to arms, Mathew’s speech received the only standing ovation of the convention.

While at the convention, Mathews renewed acquaintance with Robert Allan Martinez, a former Ku Klux Klansman from Philadelphia, whom he unsuccessfully tried to recruit into the White American Bastion. Their close friendship would eventually prove to be Mathews’s undoing.

In late September 1983, Mathews invited eight men, whom he felt held beliefs similar to his own, to his property in Metaline Falls: Kenneth Loft, his neighbor and best friend; David Eden Lane, a former Ku Klux Klansman from Denver, Colorado; Daniel R. Bauer, Denver Daw Parmenter II, Randolph George Duey, and Bruce Carroll Pierce from the Aryan Nations; and Richard Harold Kemp and William Soderquist, recent recruits from the National Alliance. Although most of the men were known to law enforcement, none had yet committed a violent crime or been in prison.

The group Mathews founded that night became known variously as The Order, The Silent Brotherhood, and the White American Bastion. The Turner Diaries became their bible. The Order’s fundamental aim was violent overthrow of the “Zionist Occupation Government,” or “ZOG,” a euphemism for the United States government, which they believed was controlled by a Jewish cabal. In the novel, The Order’s revolution is financed by armed robberies, counterfeiting, and other violent crimes intended to disrupt the American economy. And that’s exactly what Mathews and his gang of neo-Nazis decided to do.

On Monday, December 3, 1984, the FBI’s Seattle office received an anonymous call from a pay telephone, in which the person said that Mathews and other members of The Order were hiding on Whidbey Island and were heavily armed. When the tip proved to be true, the FBI dispatched 150 agents to the island to make sure that none of the fugitives escaped.

By Friday morning, December 7, 1984, the FBI had all three hideouts surrounded. Agents arrested four members of the gang without incident, including Duey, but Mathews refused to surrender. A 35-hour standoff ensued, during which Mathews fired at the agents numerous times with a submachine gun. On Saturday, negotiations stalled and about 6:30 p.m., the FBI fired three M-79 Starburst illumination flares into the house, knowing it would likely catch on fire and end the standoff. Mathews still did not surrender. On Sunday morning, agents found his charred remains, confirmed later by dental records, inside the burned-out building. News reports about the siege on Whidbey Island was the first time the American public learned about The Order and their war against the ZOG.

The death of Robert Jay Mathews signaled the end of The Order as a viable group. Authorities speculated that Bruce Pierce would assume leadership, but most of the gang remained in hiding, scattered across the country. The FBI immediately forged ahead, hunting down and arresting every member and affiliate of The Order they could find. In late December 1984, federal prosecutors from six states met secretly in Seattle and formulated a plan to put an end to The Order’s terror campaign. They decided to use the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), created in 1970 to combat organized crime.

https://www.historylink.org/File/7921

From the Past, a Chilling Warning About the Extremists of the Present

Federal agents and prosecutors who dismantled the Order see troubling echoes of its threat to democracy in the Capitol riot and the growing extremist activity across the country.

“When you see the country as politically and philosophically divided as it is today, that makes it more likely that somebody could take advantage of these times to bring about another revolutionary concept like the Order,” said Wayne Manis, the main FBI agent on the case. “We stopped the Order. We did not stop the ideology.”

Those who tracked the group say the legacy of the Order can be seen in the prominent role that far-right organizations like the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers played in storming the Capitol on Jan. 6.

“Many of the participants of these groups today come from the same sources as the Order,” said Gene Wilson, the lead prosecutor, who went on to become a U.S. magistrate judge in Seattle before switching to private practice. “I think they might be just as committed to totally changing democracy as we know it.”

The men who played central roles in disbanding the Order still consider it the most important case of their lives. Given the Order’s “potential for violence and destruction,” said Manis, no other domestic group posed a similar threat to the United States.

Just before federal agents closed in, its members had been figuring out how to sabotage the power grid in Los Angeles, hoping to incite riots and looting. Men affiliated with the Order had also surveyed the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City as a target, which helped to inspire Timothy McVeigh to blow it up in April 1995, killing 168 people in the worst homegrown terrorist attack in U.S. history.

Mathews, raised among white supremacists, organized a heavily armed, clandestine guerrilla force designed to spark a civil war. Adherents sought to restore America to its imagined origins and considered preserving the “green graves” of their white forefathers a sacred duty. To join, members stepped into a wide candlelit circle formed around a white infant and pledged to fight, in secret and without fear of death, to make the United States an Aryan nation.

In northern Idaho in the 1980s, the public face of the far-right was the Aryan Nations compound near Hayden Lake, a gathering of white supremacists and neo-Nazis collected around the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, part of the Christian Identity movement. Its pastor, Richard Girnt Butler, preached that the United States must be restored as a white nation for the second coming of Christ to occur.

Then, as now, adherents of extremist groups were mainly white men. “They were undereducated or poorly educated, underemployed, unsuccessful in whatever they were trying to do workwise,” Wilson said. “They were seeking relevance and status, a meaning for their lives, and looking for somebody readily identifiable to blame. They blamed minority groups for their problems.”

They railed against immigrants coming to destroy the country and against the elites in what they called the “Zionist Occupied Government,” whom they accused of abetting such threatening changes for cheap labor, among other reasons.

The men who disbanded the Order believe that any contemporary group with similarly dangerous aspirations would also likely be hidden. Members of the Order shunned publicity to concentrate on crime. “Everything that they did was covert,” said Tom McDaniel, a former FBI agent who moved to Montana in 1984 to pursue the case and never left.

“I feel that if there is an organization today from the extreme right that is following in the footsteps of the Order,” Manis said, “you will not know anything about it until it is too late and they have already done something dastardly.”

https://www.yahoo.com/news/past-chilling-warning-extremists-present-151112883.html

Good Ubu shit. Good doggie!!!
The ONLY thing the Dixie Swastika deserves
Former Aryan Nations Leader Gets 50 Years for Child Molestation

Former Aryan Nations leader August B. Kreis III, who’s history of neo-Nazi activism spans over forty years, may never be a free man again.

The 61-year-old has been convicted of three counts of child molestation, which included repeated sexual abuse to two young girls between the ages of 10 and 14,  and has been sentenced to a total of 50 years, a possible life sentence given his age.

According to the State newspaper, Kreis sentence of two 15-year terms and one 20-year term could have been served concurrently, but Kreis requested they were served consecutively and Lexington County Circuit Court Judge Douet “Jack” Earley obliged him. Kreis was arrested in February 2014 after the mother of one of his victims contacted police to report she was assaulted. One of the victims, now in her 20s read a poem in court to Kreis calling him a “monster” and reminding everyone in the courtroom that abusers such as Kreis shatter the lives of their young victims, leaving them emotionally scarred.

“Days turn into months, and months into years, and every night is full of this child’s worst fears,” the woman read. “Looking to the stars and wishing for a different life, this pain pierces through me like a jagged knife. … Go through life watching behind me, and hold onto my heart with one hand. … My soul cries at the mention of your name.”

“Your disgusting little secret is out,” she concluded. “I hope you are haunted till the day you die for the things you’ve done,” she said. Judge Earley asked her for a copy of the poem, telling her, “You are a brave young lady,”


Involved in neo-Nazi activism since his high school days, Kreis dropped out of high school in Newark, NJ and went into the Navy serving in Vietnam for nine months before he was discharged as unsuitable for military service. He was in the Ku Klux Klan and Posse Comitatus, another white supremacist group, before joining Aryan Nations. By that time, Kreis had been one of the more recognizable faces in neo-Nazi circles, famously being thrown off the Jerry Springer show for insulting him and holding musical events on his Pennsylvania compound. Kreis worked closely with then-Aryan Nations members Charles John Juba, who currently lives in Kansas City, and Keystone State “Skinheads” founding member Steve Smith, currently a Republican committeeman who once posted on Stormfront that people like Kreis and Juba “go way back” and “have a proven track record of standing up and fighting Jewish supremacism.”

In recent years, Kreis’ activism has slowed down in conjunction with health and legal troubles. In addition to having both legs amputated due to diabetes, he pled guilty to fraud after he was caught drawing a need-based pension for military service while failing to report thousands of dollars in other income. It was just after serving a year in prison and house arrest along with two years probation when he was arrested on the child molestation charges.

Even while in court, Kreis attempted to maintain his activism, displaying a “Vote for Donald Trump” sign during the trial, which the judge instructed the jury to ignore, and declaring his positions just before sentencing. “I will always hate the Jew,” he said. This government is run by an evil group of people, and please — vote for Trump!”

A fucking pedophile pervert Trumpturd white supremacist Nazi who should be executed.

https://idavox.com/index.php/2015/11/08/former-aryan-nations-leader-gets-50-years-for-child-molestation/

Fascist Dicktater wanna be Commander Bone Spurs
The Trump campaign has knowingly taken thousands of dollars from a neo-Nazi leader and other racists

Morris Gulett, a neo-Nazi leader who created an outpost of the Aryan Nations in Louisiana, has donated at least $2,000 to President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign, according to data collected by Popular Information.

He has donated at least 29 times since 2017, and the Trump campaign was reportedly made aware of the donations in 2018 by The Forward.

The Trump campaign has accepted thousands of dollars from racist extremists, including a neo-Nazi leader who runs an outpost of the Aryan Nations in Louisiana.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/the-trump-campaign-has-knowingly-taken-thousands-of-dollars-from-a-neo-nazi-leader-and-other-racists/ar-BB18yUNl

Minuteman Co-Founder Chris Simcox Convicted of Molesting a Child

An Arizona jury on Wednesday convicted a founder of the Minuteman border-watch group of molesting one young girl, but acquitted him of engaging in sexual conduct with another.

Christopher Allen Simcox, 55, was found guilty on charges that he molested a 5-year-old girl and showed her pornography. He escaped a mandatory life sentence when the jury acquitted him on charges that he engaged in sexual conduct with a 6-year-old girl.

A molestation conviction carries a sentence of 10 to 24 years in prison. Simcox, who was convicted on two molestation counts, is scheduled to be sentenced on July 5.

Simcox, who isn’t a lawyer but nonetheless represented himself at trial, told jurors that he didn’t abuse the girls.

In closing arguments, a prosecutor scoffed at Simcox’s claim that the girls were pressured by adults to bring the allegations.

His case was also noteworthy for Simcox’s insistence that he should be allowed to personally question the girls on the witness stand.

Prosecutors argued that letting Simcox question the girls would cause them emotional distress. In the end, Simcox got an attorney to pose the questions.

County Attorney Bill Montgomery, whose office prosecuted Simcox, said in a statement that he commended the victims for having the courage to come forward.

Kerrie Droban, the lawyer who served as Simcox’s adviser, said she was unsure whether Simcox would appeal the verdict.

“The jury listened attentively,” Droban said. “They gave him a fair trial.”

Simcox’s arrest in 2013 came after his career as an advocate for tougher immigration policies had fizzled.

The Minuteman movement stepped into the spotlight in 2005 when illegal immigration heated up as a national political issue. Minuteman volunteers fanned out along the nation’s southern border to watch for illegal crossings and report them to federal agents.

The movement splintered after Simcox and another co-founder parted ways and headed up separate groups.

Simcox, who once served as publisher of the Tombstone Tumbleweed newspaper, went on to briefly enter Arizona’s 2010 U.S. Senate primary against incumbent John McCain but dropped out of the race. His name didn’t appear on the ballot.

More than a decade ago, Simcox was sentenced to two years of probation for misdemeanor convictions in federal court for carrying a concealed handgun at the Coronado National Memorial near the Arizona-Mexico border in January 2003.

An attorney who assisted him at trial said Simcox will likely spend the rest of his life in prison, given Arizona’s tough sentencing guidelines.

https://idavox.com/index.php/2016/06/12/minuteman-co-founder-chris-simcox-convicted-of-molesting-a-child/

These stories show, why, we should never show any mercy to white supremacists or Nazis